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Posted on 2010-05-10

How to Get Knocked Up

So, you’ve figured out where babies come from, and now you want to have one. Good for you! Many women who get pregnant didn’t plan on it in the first place, so you’re ahead of the game if you’ve decided it’s time before you actually get pregnant. And while you might know what needs to be done to make a baby, you might not know that the way you do it might help to increase your chances of actually succeeding.

Let’s start out by remembering that, as long as sperm makes it into the vagina, you can become pregnant. Yes, there are certain sexual positions that will help that happen, and some that will help the sperm get further along toward the cervix. But you can technically get pregnant in just about any sexual position. As long as you and your partner are both fertile and nothing’s interfering with your reproductive organs, it’s likely to happen just about any time you’re ovulating and have sex.

But with all of that out of the way, you need to recognize that some positions will help you get pregnant. These positions deposit the sperm closer to the cervix. It is there that the woman’s cervical mucus will help to protect those sperm from the acidic environment of the vagina, and to help the sperm move on their journey toward the fallopian tubes.

Some positions tend to use gravity to their advantage. The missionary or “man on top” position tends to fall into this category. Other positions tend to deposit the sperm further away from the cervix, and cause gravity to work against getting pregnant. Positions where the woman is upright, such as sitting or standing, or with the woman on top, tend to make it a little harder.

There are other things, of course, that you can do to get knocked up. Some people thing that laying down for about half an hour after sex with your bum propped up on a pillow might help. There are even “conception pillows” on the market specially designed for this purpose.

If you’re having trouble getting pregnant, of course, you can talk to your doctor. She might be able to offer some testing, treatment or at least advice, beyond just what position to do it in.