Can Certain Medications Affect My Cervical Mucus?



Cervical mucus is a substance that is produced by a woman’s body during her monthly cycle. Cervical mucus is most plentiful and at its peak during ovulation. Cervical mucus plays an important role in conception. Cervical mucus helps the sperm to survive once inside a woman’s body, and helps the sperm get to the egg so that the egg can be fertilized.

Robitussin is an example of an over-the-counter medication that can affect your cervical mucus. The active ingredient in robutussin, guaifenesin, works to prevent the production of hostile cervical mucus and helps to promote the production of egg-white cervical mucus. You should take no more than the recommended dosage of this medication, and you should try to get the version of Robitussin that contains only guaifenesin as its active ingredient. This medication is also available in a pill form, but is generally only available like this through a prescription.

Some prescription medications can affect your cervical mucus, as well. The fertility medicine Clomid, for example, can sometimes affect your cervical mucus by making it become hostile. This means that your cervical mucus, rather than helping sperm to survive and travel, will instead prevent the sperm from making its journey to fertilize your egg. Clomid can also change the consistency of your cervical mucus, or can sometimes prevent you from having any cervical mucus at all. This is surprising, considering that Clomid generally speaking has a fairly successful track record in treating certain types of infertility.

There are a variety of other medications that can affect your cervical mucus as well. Antihistamines, for example, can decrease or thicken cervical mucus, as can dicyclomine. Hormones, such as contained in birth control pills or in hormone therapy, can sometimes change cervical mucus one direction or the other, as well.

If you are concerned that the medications you are taking are affecting your cervical mucus, contact your health care provider or fertility practitioner to discuss options for other medications or for ways to increase or improve the quality of your cervical mucus.


Last modified: February 10, 2013