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Hormones That Play A Part In Conception

The hormones that a woman’s body produce play an important role in conception. If some of the hormones that a woman’s body produces don’t function properly, conception is unlikely or even impossible. Likewise, from the date of conception forward, there are hormone changes that occur in a woman’s body.

It is important to understand what hormones do what tasks in regard to conception. The first hormone of mention, Follicle Stimulating Hormone, or FSH for short, works with the ovaries to help it produce and release mature eggs. Each egg that is released is a part of what is called a “follicle.” Each follicle then works to produce the hormone estrogen.

The hormone estrogen helps your cervical mucus to be more hospitable to sperm, making it more likely that conception could occur. In addition, increased estrogen prompts the release of another hormone. This hormone, known as luteinizing hormone or LH, prompts the egg to come out of its follicle, where it can be fertilized. The shed follicle becomes a “corpeus luteum.” In fact, the time from when you ovulate to when you start your next period is referred to as the “luteal phase.

The corpeus luteum then starts to produce progesterone, another hormone. Progesterone helps the uterus to maintain its lining so that a fertilized egg can implant. Progesterone raises your Basal Body Temperature. Many women who are trying to conceive also test their Basal Body Temperature as well, so that they can tell when she has ovulated.

Once an egg is fertilized on the date of conception, hormones change. Soon, within around 7 to 10 days, a woman’s body will begin to produce the hormone human chorionic Gonadotrophin (better known as hCG). This is the hormone that is measured in a pregnancy test. Levels of hCG will continue to change and grow, doubling every two to three days. Levels hormone human chorionic Gonadotrophin of will reach their peak around the third month of the pregnancy, after which they will begin to decline again.


Last modified: February 10, 2013


The information provided here should not be considered medical advice. It is based on the average experience of women trying to conceive and may not be what you may be experiencing. It's not meant to be a replacement for any advice you may receive from your doctor. If you have any concerns about your cycle or our ability to get pregnant, we advise you to contact your doctor.