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Different Kinds of Basal Body Thermometers

BBT Thermometer

 

Basal Body temperature (BBT) refers to your body’s exact temperature at the lowest point of your day. The lowest temperature occurs in the morning, just after you wake up, and before you begin your day. For the most accurate reading, you should use your basal body thermometer even before you get out of bed in the morning. Many women who are tracking their basal body temperature will keep their special basal body thermometer next to their bed on a night stand or end table.

There are different sorts of basal body thermometers. The most important thing about a basal body thermometer is its accuracy. A basal body thermometer should be accurate to one tenth of a degree Fahrenheit, or five hundredths of a degree Celsius. A basal body thermometer needs to be this accurate because the changes that take place to a woman’s basal body temperature throughout her monthly cycle will range from about four tenths of a degree to six tenths of a degree Fahrenheit. All basal body thermometers, then, need this level of accuracy.

Basal body thermometers vary in how exactly they measure your basal body temperature. There are basal body thermometers that are mercury-based, just like many other sorts of thermometers. In addition, there are basal body thermometers that are digital, as well. While some women may prefer one type of basal body thermometer to another, the fact of the matter is that either a digital or a mercury thermometer will very likely suit the woman’s needs.

Basal body thermometers also vary in how they are used. There are basal body thermometers that are used orally. That is, they are used like a regular thermometer, and placed under the tongue for a certain amount of time. There are also basal body thermometers that are used rectally, that are inserted into the rectum in order to get the basal body temperature. Neither of these kinds of basal body thermometers is thought to be more accurate than the other, and the oral basal body thermometers are, generally speaking, easier to use.


Last modified: February 10, 2013


The information provided here should not be considered medical advice. It is based on the average experience of women trying to conceive and may not be what you may be experiencing. It's not meant to be a replacement for any advice you may receive from your doctor. If you have any concerns about your cycle or our ability to get pregnant, we advise you to contact your doctor.