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Are There Herbs That Can Increase Sperm Motility?

While we often think of infertility problems in the way that they affect women, the fact of the matter is that men are just as likely as women to experience some difficulty or another with conception.  While there are many more types of problems that can affect female fertility, male infertility is generally due to one problem with the man’s sperm or another.  While the most common problem with a man’s sperm has to do with the number of sperm that his semen contains, known as sperm count, a great deal of male factor infertility is due to a problem with the way that a man’s sperm moves, or the sperm motility.  Unfortunately, there are relatively few medical options that can increase sperm motility.  Because of this, many men have looked with hope to a variety of herbs that can increase sperm motility.  While these herbs haven’t been proven clinically to help with increasing sperm motility, some men have experienced success with them.

The first herb that may be able to help increase sperm motility is Panax Ginseng.  This herb is thought to increase sperm motility, and to enhance sperm count as well.  Lepidium Meyenii, or Maca, is a traditional Peruvian herb that is used for a variety of purposes.  Maca is thought to increase semen volume, sperm count, and sperm motility.  Polygonum Cuspidatum, or Resveratrol, is an antioxidant that is thought to help the concentration of sperm, as well as increase sperm motility.  Pine Bark is another herbal antioxidant that may especially help being able to increase sperm motility.

There are other supplements that may be helpful as well.  Although they are not herbs, they are worth mentioning.  L-Arginine is a natural amino acid that can not only help increase sperm motility by making sluggish sperm more lively, it is also thought to help reduce stress.  The mineral Zinc is also important and can increase sperm motility, but it may be possible that too much Zinc could actually have the opposite effect, and increase sperm count but actually reduce sperm motility.

 

 


Last modified: February 10, 2013


The information provided here should not be considered medical advice. It is based on the average experience of women trying to conceive and may not be what you may be experiencing. It's not meant to be a replacement for any advice you may receive from your doctor. If you have any concerns about your cycle or our ability to get pregnant, we advise you to contact your doctor.